Toxic Fandom, Politicization of Entertainment Is Killing My Enjoyment of Movies – Including the Star Wars Franchise

Toxic Fandom, Politicization of Entertainment Is Killing My Enjoyment of Movies – including the Star Wars Franchise

I’ve enjoyed watching movies since I was a kid.

I’ve also enjoyed reading professional movie reviews and critiques – and this was years before the advent of the internet.

In the last several years, though, things – especially online – have turned so negative that it’s been souring my excitement or enjoyment of movies (well, that, plus finding out that certain actors are not as nice in real life as they are in some of their movie roles).

Not only do average joe’s in comment boxes under professional movie reviews seem to have gotten bitter, hostile, and angry in the last few years, but professional movie reviewers have become extremely nit-picky.

At least one article I reference below contains quotes by someone who thinks fandom has always been negative, and had there been a Twitter in the 1980s and 1990s, that the fans would have been just as bad back then – I’m not sure I agree with that.

I do think social media has changed things (for the worse), but I also feel there’s been an overall shift in culture itself. I am not so sure that fans back in the ’80s and ’90s would have been as hateful as they have been behaving the last five to ten years.

Professional movie critics these days seem to have a personal vendetta against movies generally, or certain film franchises, genres, actors, or directors.

I don’t recall seeing that level of animosity from professional critics in the 1970s to the early 2000s.

Film critics back in the day seemed more detached, even-handed, and objective (which made their critiques easier and more enjoyable to read).

Continue reading “Toxic Fandom, Politicization of Entertainment Is Killing My Enjoyment of Movies – Including the Star Wars Franchise”

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Actor Chris O’Dowd Criticizes Sexually Abusive Movie Producer Harvey Weinstein But He’s Got An Inconsistent Record About Women’s Issues

Actor Chris O’Dowd Criticizes Sexually Abusive Movie Producer Harvey Weinstein But He’s Got An Inconsistent Record About Women’s Issues

I was looking up information about the Irish abortion referendum debates recently, which is how I came across actor Chris O’Dowd’s name in the news and on some of my social media accounts.

O’Dowd is somewhat hypocritical or inconsistent on a few different topics. This is yet another one.

Here is the link I came across:

Irish actor Chris O’Dowd brands disgraced Harvey Weinstein a ‘pig’ and wishes he could ‘time travel a head-butt’ after working with producer several years ago – The Sun, by 

Excerpts from that article, which is dated October 2017:

The comedic actor [O’Dowd] said he was completely unaware of the string of sexual harassment claims against the 65-year-old when he worked with him a number of years ago

Continue reading “Actor Chris O’Dowd Criticizes Sexually Abusive Movie Producer Harvey Weinstein But He’s Got An Inconsistent Record About Women’s Issues”

Nice Guy Typecasting: Other Than His Role in ‘Bridesmaids,’ I’ve Never Really Seen Actor Chris O’Dowd Play a “Nice Guy.”

Nice Guy Typecasting: Other Than His Role in ‘Bridesmaids,’ I’ve Never Really Seen Actor Chris O’Dowd Play a “Nice Guy.”

Most of the following originally appeared in an assessment of actor Chris O’Dowd’s movie career I wrote in 2016, but that post was getting way too long, so I’m breaking that content off and placing it here.


I enjoyed O’Dowd’s turn as Nathan Rhodes in 2011’s ‘Bridesmaids’ film (I saw it for the first time on cable television in 2015).

I have no desire to watch O’Dowd’s performances in other movies as a sexist jerk who makes rape jokes or who abuses animals (but I have unfortunately seen a few of his other movies).

O’Dowd was asked in an interview (that I linked to in a previous post on this blog) about playing jerks in movies after having played the nice guy cop in ‘Bridesmaids.’

The interviewer said O’Dowd laughed about it and made fun of women who liked that Rhodes character by saying something like women viewers wouldn’t like him anymore, not after they saw any of the creeps he was going to play for several movies in a row after ‘Bridesmaids.’

How dense and unappreciative of O’Dowd.

Continue reading “Nice Guy Typecasting: Other Than His Role in ‘Bridesmaids,’ I’ve Never Really Seen Actor Chris O’Dowd Play a “Nice Guy.””

He Complained About Not Being Paid Enough for a Movie Role But Apparently Had Enough Money To Pay Cash for a $870,000 Home All At Once

He Complained About Not Being Paid Enough for a Movie Role But Apparently Had Enough  Money To Pay Cash for a $870,000 Home All At Once

The following originally appeared in an assessment of actor Chris O’Dowd’s movie career I wrote in 2016, but that post was getting way too long, so I’m breaking that content off and placing it here.

I mentioned in that post that O’Dowd, after his appearance in the 2011 film Bridesmaids, kept taking roles in movies that were awful – the characters he played were awful (sexist, violent, profane, or what have you), and the movies themselves were terrible (terrible or boring story-line and so forth).

That O’Dowd was able to afford a $870,000 home in West Hollywood (see information below) tells me he’s not hurting for money, although he complained in a few interviews that he wasn’t paid enough to play the character of Nathan Rhodes in ‘Bridesmaids’.

I assume O’Dowd paid for this home in one lump sum (he talked about being flat broke after buying it), and that he is not paying a monthly mortgage on it.

SALARY

As to his other roles, according to these celebrity salary sites I’ve seen, it appears that O’Dowd earns something like $500,000 to $700,000 per movie
I cannot wrap my head around this, either.

-The guy is a Z-grade actor, not an A-lister, such as a Tom Cruise or a Brad Pitt (which I say as a matter of observation, not as an insult),

-He’s only been in a small number of movies, and

-He’s usually not on the screen more than about 5 to 10 minutes in total in most of the films I have seen him in.

How can someone doing so little film work, who is not as well-known as a Tom Cruise, a Robert Redford, or a George Clooney, be getting paid so much money for so little work?

COMPLAINED ABOUT PAY

I have no idea how much O’Dowd was paid to play Rhodes in ‘Bridesmaids,’ but he complained in one interview the pay was not much (he said, “the pay was not brilliant”).

Continue reading “He Complained About Not Being Paid Enough for a Movie Role But Apparently Had Enough Money To Pay Cash for a $870,000 Home All At Once”

Sylvester Stallone’s Temper Problem and Gross Weirdness

Sylvester Stallone’s Temper Problem and Gross Weirdness

(This post has been updated to add new information. Latest update: January 5,  2018)


I began work on another post or two, related to the sexual abuse allegations against Stallone by various women, and I don’t know when or if I’ll get around to finishing those.

In the course of looking up more material for those posts, I ran across some other  disturbing, gross information on the man.

For legal purposes: imagine everything below has the word “alleged” in front of it.

Personally, I have no reason to doubt this information, because I cannot see what any of these people have to gain by it discussing it, and I’m starting to see a pattern emerge with some of these things.

I do believe Stallone raped and verbally abused his half sister, and that he sexually exploited teen girls at the height of his fame.

All of that is degenerate enough, but this other information – about the hotel rooms, hiring prostitutes to defecate in front of him, and so forth – is also disgusting.

Continue reading “Sylvester Stallone’s Temper Problem and Gross Weirdness”

Women Celebrities Who Victim-Blame Women Sexual Assault Survivors

Women Celebrities Who Victim-Blame Women Sexual Assault Survivors

(this post has been edited since it was originally published to add new names or links)


I so far have not seen any male celebrities engage in victim-blaming, but I’ve seen about 3 or 4 women celebrities do so.

It’s beyond me how a woman (famous or not) can fault a woman for having been raped or sexually harassed.

But they’ve done so. A few have later apologized.

So far, actress Pamela Anderson has not only not apologized for her victim blaming comments (comments which she insists are not victim blaming – but they ultimately are), but she refuses to apologize, and I disagree with her views on this.

Some women may be too young, naive, or trusting, and that is no excuse for a pervert such as a Harvey Weinstein to exploit that and sexually abuse them, but Anderson is basically saying they are to blame for being naive or too trusting or for lacking life experience.

A note to actress Kirstie Alley (link to her victim blaming comments farther below):

If Alley is wanting to know why women do not accuse their rapists or harassers immediately, right on the spot after being propositioned or groped, and so on:

Some women do not confront their workplace abusers at all, or not for until many years later, because many women are too afraid to do so immediately.  They are often in shock or experiencing emotional trauma.

They may be afraid their abuser may rape them again right then and there, kill them, cause other physical injury, or get them fired from their job.

Furthermore, a lot of women, especially younger ones, do not have the necessary self confidence and level of assertiveness to confront an abuser – many girls and women are brought up by their parents, any religion they are raised in, and the culture, to be docile, non-confrontational, and passive (this is how I was raised).

Boys and men in our culture are often encouraged to be out-spoken, confrontational, and bold, while girls and women are often punished, ostracized, or discouraged from having those qualities – qualities which are necessary ones to confront abusers face- to- face.

From Time Magazine’s Person of the Year: The Silence Breakers

Nearly all of the people TIME interviewed about their [sexual harassment] experiences expressed a crushing fear of what would happen to them personally, to their families or to their jobs if they spoke up.

For some, the fear was borne of a threat of physical violence. Pascual felt trapped and terrified when her harasser began to stalk her at home, but felt she was powerless to stop him. If she told anyone, the abuser warned her, he would come after her or her children.

Those who are often most vulnerable in society—immigrants, people of color, people with disabilities, low-income workers and LGBTQ people—described many types of dread. If they raised their voices, would they be fired? Would their communities turn against them? Would they be killed?

Juana Melara, who has worked as a hotel housekeeper for decades, says she and her fellow housekeepers didn’t complain about guests who exposed themselves or masturbated in front of them for fear of losing the paycheck they needed to support their families.

…Many of the people who have come forward also mentioned a different fear, one less visceral but no less real, as a reason for not speaking out: if you do, your complaint becomes your identity.

(end quotes)

Here are some of the women celebrities who have engaged in victim-blaming ever since the Harvey Weinstein story broke:

Mayim Bialik

Mayim Bialik Apologizes (for Real This Time) for Her Victim-Blaming Op-Ed

Mayim Bialik Apologizes After Being Accused of Victim-Blaming Sexual Adult Survivors

Mayim Bialik Apologizes for Her Controversial Harvey Weinstein Op-Ed by Tolly Wright, October 18, 2017

Mayim Bialik has issued an apology on social media for the New York Times op-ed she wrote last week about being a “nontraditional looking” actress in Hollywood.

The Big Bang Theory star landed in hot water among some readers who were upset about the connections Bialik seemed to draw between her choice to dress modestly and how she has managed to escape three decades in the industry without an encounter like those detailed by Harvey Weinstein’s accusers.

Continue reading “Women Celebrities Who Victim-Blame Women Sexual Assault Survivors”

Women of SNL Issue Misguided, Harmful Statement in Support of Sen. Al Franken by Mattie Kahn

He may be a senator now, but for a number of years, Franken was an actor on the TV show ‘Saturday Night Live.’

Women of SNL Issue Misguided, Harmful Statement in Support of Sen. Al Franken

by Mattie Hahn

Thirty-six women who previously worked with Al Franken during his run on Saturday Night Live have issued a statement of support for the Minnesota senator, following accusations by two women that he kissed or groped them without their consent.

The letter, which was released on Twitter and published in the Boston Globe, summons all the worst ever cliches used to absolve men of despicable behavior and sequences them to horrendous effect.

Continue reading “Women of SNL Issue Misguided, Harmful Statement in Support of Sen. Al Franken by Mattie Kahn”