Going ‘Overboard’: Hollywood’s Glut of Gender-Swap Remakes

Going ‘Overboard’: Hollywood’s Glut of Gender-Swap Remakes

I first found the gender swap remake movies interesting, but as this has been going on for a few years now,  I’m getting a little tired of it.

I support more diversity in movies and television shows (as in more women characters), but it would be nice to see original content, as opposed to taking a movie or show from the 1980s and replacing male leads with female leads.

This must be a cyclical trend – the author of the piece below says gender swapping in movies is nothing new, but I don’t remember it being a ‘thing’ in the 1980s or 1990s so much.

Going ‘Overboard’: Hollywood’s Glut of Gender-Swap Remakes

June 2018, by AFP Relax News

From the polarizing “Ghostbusters” remake to the controversy over female versions of James Bond and Doctor Who, Hollywood’s proclivity for gender-swapped retreads is among its most enduring and contentious.

The trend — seen as empowering or annoying, depending on who you ask — is getting fresh attention with “Ocean’s 8” due for release on Friday, “Overboard” still in theaters and “What Men Want” coming out in January.

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Toxic Fandom, Politicization of Entertainment Is Killing My Enjoyment of Movies – Including the Star Wars Franchise

Toxic Fandom, Politicization of Entertainment Is Killing My Enjoyment of Movies – including the Star Wars Franchise

I’ve enjoyed watching movies since I was a kid.

I’ve also enjoyed reading professional movie reviews and critiques – and this was years before the advent of the internet.

In the last several years, though, things – especially online – have turned so negative that it’s been souring my excitement or enjoyment of movies (well, that, plus finding out that certain actors are not as nice in real life as they are in some of their movie roles).

Not only do average joe’s in comment boxes under professional movie reviews seem to have gotten bitter, hostile, and angry in the last few years, but professional movie reviewers have become extremely nit-picky.

At least one article I reference below contains quotes by someone who thinks fandom has always been negative, and had there been a Twitter in the 1980s and 1990s, that the fans would have been just as bad back then – I’m not sure I agree with that.

I do think social media has changed things (for the worse), but I also feel there’s been an overall shift in culture itself. I am not so sure that fans back in the ’80s and ’90s would have been as hateful as they have been behaving the last five to ten years.

Professional movie critics these days seem to have a personal vendetta against movies generally, or certain film franchises, genres, actors, or directors.

I don’t recall seeing that level of animosity from professional critics in the 1970s to the early 2000s.

Film critics back in the day seemed more detached, even-handed, and objective (which made their critiques easier and more enjoyable to read).

Continue reading “Toxic Fandom, Politicization of Entertainment Is Killing My Enjoyment of Movies – Including the Star Wars Franchise”

Actor Chris O’Dowd Criticizes Sexually Abusive Movie Producer Harvey Weinstein But He’s Got An Inconsistent Record About Women’s Issues

Actor Chris O’Dowd Criticizes Sexually Abusive Movie Producer Harvey Weinstein But He’s Got An Inconsistent Record About Women’s Issues

I was looking up information about the Irish abortion referendum debates recently, which is how I came across actor Chris O’Dowd’s name in the news and on some of my social media accounts.

O’Dowd is somewhat hypocritical or inconsistent on a few different topics. This is yet another one.

Here is the link I came across:

Irish actor Chris O’Dowd brands disgraced Harvey Weinstein a ‘pig’ and wishes he could ‘time travel a head-butt’ after working with producer several years ago – The Sun, by 

Excerpts from that article, which is dated October 2017:

The comedic actor [O’Dowd] said he was completely unaware of the string of sexual harassment claims against the 65-year-old when he worked with him a number of years ago

Continue reading “Actor Chris O’Dowd Criticizes Sexually Abusive Movie Producer Harvey Weinstein But He’s Got An Inconsistent Record About Women’s Issues”

Solo: A Star Wars Story – Why Prequels Are Killing The Art of Storytelling by S. Rose

Solo: A Star Wars Story – Why Prequels Are Killing The Art of Storytelling by S. Rose

Similar arguments have been raised by other authors regarding how and why reboots and remakes and sequels are killing good story telling and Hollywood box office.

(I first saw this article by way of  Hollywood- In-Toto’s Twitter.)

Solo: A Star Wars Story – Why Prequels Are Killing The Art of Storytelling

Excerpts:

We’re all excited to see Chewie hit the hyperdrive and test drive the brand new Millennium Falcon, but when the stars turn to streaks of light in Solo: AStar Wars Story, we’ll be in reverse gear.

We’re going back: back to 1970s-retro sci-fi aesthetics, back to characters we know better than they know themselves, and back to a story whose intricacies are all but irrelevant since we already know the consequences.

You might have been getting this feeling a lot recently. Going to the movies is starting to feel like being Guy Pearce in Memento: instead of forming new memories, we’re discovering what happened before.

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From Vulture: Every Netflix Original Movie, Ranked – O’Dowd Appears in Two on the List, and the Reviewer is Not Impressed with the Films

From Vulture: Every Netflix Original Movie, Ranked – O’Dowd Appears in Two on the List, and the Reviewer is Not Impressed with the Films

Chris O’Dowd appeared in at least two of the movies on this list – and this is largely a negative list. The guy who put it together is not impressed with many of these Netflix movies.

The film “Cloverfield Paradox” makes it to Vulture’s list at number 96 – O’Dowd had a role in that. O’Dowd was also in the film “The Incredible Jessica James,” which appears on the list at number 62.

I’ve already mentioned on this blog a few times the issues I take with O’Dowd (such as here, here, here, here, and here – among other posts), and I also have a longer post where I’ve critiqued most of his movies to date.

O’Dowd said in an interview once that after his role in “Bridemaids’ – which was both a quality role and a pretty good film – that he was offered a selection of mediocre romantic comedy roles, which he turned down.

Big mistake.

O’Dowd went on to reject mediocre rom coms (movies which I, and many others, find okay to watch) for really hideous, awful, stupid or vulgar movies in which he plays completely unappealing, tacky, or vulgar characters.

O’Dowd should have skipped those Z-grade, poor quality movies and taken the rom com roles. A mediocre rom com beats a cruddy, poorly made Grade-Z horror or comedy film any day of the week.

In mathematical notation of sorts:

Second Grade Rom Com Movie > (greater than) Lousy Movie

Why would an actor make the horrible decision to reject appearing in mediocre, yet serviceable, enjoyable rom com movies, to appear in Grade-Z level dreck that nobody liked and/or that went straight to NetFlix?

O’Dowd had a built-in fan base with women such as myself at one point, who enjoyed the hell out of his Rhodes character in Bridesmaids, but totally blew that capital on choosing to appear in these awful movies, and by behaving like a crass or condescending jerk, in interviews or on social media. Totally blew it.

Every Netflix Original Movie, Ranked

Excerpts:

This post was originally published in November 2017. We have updated it with Netflix’s recent offerings.

Netflix has spent the last few years and several billions of dollars on a crusade to be taken more seriously.

Continue reading “From Vulture: Every Netflix Original Movie, Ranked – O’Dowd Appears in Two on the List, and the Reviewer is Not Impressed with the Films”

Actress Molly Ringwald’s New Yorker Commentary on the Movies of John Hughes

Actress Molly Ringwald’s New Yorker Commentary on the Movies of John Hughes

Molly Ringwald finds The Breakfast Club ‘troubling’ in the #MeToo era

Breakfast Club Star Molly Ringwald ‘Troubled’ By John Hughes Classics She Starred in Upon Reevaluation

The Breakfast Club star Molly Ringwald has “reevaluated” the Eighties films she starred in as a teenager in the wake of the#MeToo movement and didn’t like the result.

From the New Yorker, by Molly Ringwald:

What About the Breakfast Club?

Excerpt:

by Molly Ringwald

… But I kept thinking about that scene [in The Breakfast Club in which a male character apparently touches Ringwald’s character inappropriately]. I thought about it again this past fall, after a number of women came forward with sexual-assault accusations against the producer Harvey Weinstein, and the #MeToo movement gathered steam.

If attitudes toward female subjugation are systemic, and I believe that they are, it stands to reason that the art we consume and sanction plays some part in reinforcing those same attitudes.

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MoviePass’s All-You-Can-See Deal: The Pros and Cons By Matthew Kitchen

MoviePass’s All-You-Can-See Deal: The Pros and Cons By Matthew Kitchen

MoviePass’s All-You-Can-See Deal: The Pros and Cons By Matthew Kitchen

Excerpts:

The MoviePass app lets you see a film a day for only $10  a month. So what’s the catch?

…. The problem is that rising costs have sapped much of the fun from the moviegoing experience. We’ve lost the ancient impulse to just show up and see what’s playing – regardless of genre or even quality.

In its place: We endlessly debate Rotten Tomatoes scores to determine whether a film is worth a date with the big screen or can safely be seen, months later, distractedly on Netflix.

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