Beatrix Potter, Work Rejected, Self-Published “The Tale of Peter Rabbit,” Now a Bestseller for All Time

Beatrix Potter, Work Rejected, Self-Published “The Tale of Peter Rabbit,” Now a Bestseller for All Time

Beatrix Potter, Work Rejected, Self-Published “The Tale of Peter Rabbit,” Now a Bestseller for All Time

Excerpts:

….Long before she became a popular published author, Beatrix developed a particular talent for scientific illustration by drawing and exploring fungi. In 1896, she wrote a paper on fungi reproduction titled “On the Germination of the Spores of Agaricaceae,” which, unfortunately, was rejected by the Royal Botanical Gardens.

A year later, George Masse, a fungi expert from Kew gardens in London, presented her work to the Linnean Society of London, a place where Beatrix, being a woman, was not permitted to present it herself. Nevertheless, scientists today recognize and appreciate her contribution to mycology.

The male members of the scientific milieu in England were not the only ones who ignored Beatrix’s aspirations. Her family also disapproved, believing that a proper, respectable lady must eventually marry and certainly mustn’t work.

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He tried and failed to turn his talent for throwing a football into stability. Now, at 48, he’s trying again.

He tried and failed to turn his talent for throwing a football into stability. Now, at 48, he’s trying again.

He tried and failed to turn his talent for throwing a football into stability. Now, at 48, he’s trying again.

Excerpts:

….Most of all, perhaps, Marinovich is held up as a cautionary tale, widely depicted as a victim of his father’s attempt to engineer a star athlete with intense physical training.

Now, the old quarterback is experiencing a midlife crisis in the lower rungs of football that is as intriguing as it is desperate.

 “We knew you’re crazy,” Marinovich says of the reaction from loved ones when he told them he was going to suit up for the SoCal Coyotes, a team in the World Developmental League. “Now it’s confirmed.”

But, in some ways, this makes sense, even as it creates odd scenes like Marinovich being tutored by a teammate half his age. Sports provide the structure, demand the discipline and establish the goals that can benefit a chronic substance abuser.

“I really haven’t known how to deal with life,” Marinovich said.

Marinovich has tried before, with little success, to parlay his talent for throwing a football into happiness and stability.

Continue reading “He tried and failed to turn his talent for throwing a football into stability. Now, at 48, he’s trying again.”

Formerly Paralyzed Man Trains to Compete in Ironman

Formerly Paralyzed Man Trains to Compete in Ironman

Idaho man working toward Iron Man goal decades after paralysis

Formerly Paralyzed Man Trains to Compete in Ironman

by B. Shiff

August 2017

After more than two decades, Rod Hutchins is finally very close to accomplishing his lifelong goal of completing an Ironman, the grueling, non-stop race that includes a 2.4-mile swim, a 112-mile bicycle ride, and a 26.2-mile run.

But Hutchins was once far from ready to race. Diagnosed with Guillain–Barré syndrome in the 1990s, Hutchins was paralyzed from the waist down, he told ABC affiliate KIFI. The syndrome causes muscle weakness and pain as the body’s immune system starts to attack its nervous system.

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Become More Resilient by Learning to Take Joy Seriously by Brad Stulberg

Become More Resilient by Learning to Take Joy Seriously by Brad Stulberg

Become More Resilient by Learning to Take Joy Seriously

Excerpts:

Grant — who, among other things, studies how people find motivation and meaning in life — showed up at Goldberg’s funeral, assured Sandberg that even though she is strong, he’d be by her side.

He offered her evidence-based tips on how to become more resilient (for both her own good and for that of her children), then helped her apply them.

The two teamed up to write a book, Option B: Facing Adversity, Building Resilience, and Finding Joy, which details Sandberg’s experience and the topic of resilience more broadly. Though it was inspired by a deeply personal tragedy, the book is filled with insight that is useful for anyone overcoming loss or failure.

I recently spoke with Grant to discuss the book and some of the key concepts in it.

You write that there are “three Ps” that often diminish resilience: personalization, pervasiveness, and permanence. Can you briefly describe each?

These are common traps that people fall into after a negative event. It’s so easy to get stuck in rumination: It’s all my fault (personalization); this is going to ruin every aspect of my life (pervasiveness); I’m going to feel like this forever (permanence). There is a wide body of evidence that if you can minimize this kind of thinking, you’ll be more resilient.

Is one most challenging to overcome?

Permanence seems to be the hardest, by far. When we are feeling horrible, we tend to project that out indefinitely, and it’s sticky. It’s hard to convince yourself that the awful feelings won’t last forever.

It seems that a large part of avoiding the three Ps — and being resilient more broadly — is related to the stories that we tell ourselves about ourselves and our lives. Yet it’s human nature to focus on negatives over positives. How can people encourage themselves to tell positive, but not delusional, stories?

It’s a tightrope walk to embrace the feelings as they come and still find a way to craft a hopeful narrative. We have to give ourselves permission to feel sadness, but at the same, realize some meaning or happiness is out there, and include that in our story, too….

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Why the Best Success Stories Often Begin With Failure by Amy Crawford

Why the Best Success Stories Often Begin With Failure by Amy Crawford

One writer’s unexpected bout of unemployment inspired him to catalogue the misadventures of those who came before him

Long before the iPhone made him the god of gadgets, Steve Jobs launched his tech career by hacking land lines to make free long-distance calls.

Bob Dylan’s band, the Golden Chords, lost a high-school talent competition to a tap dancing act.

Behind every success story is an embarrassing first effort, a stumble, a setback or a radical change of direction. It’s these first clumsy steps on the road to fame and fortune that fascinate writer Seth Fiegerman, who edits the blog OpeningLines.org, a collection of case studies on the origins of famous careers.

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Forget Positive Thinking: This Is How To Actually Change Negative Thoughts For Success by M. Wilding

Forget Positive Thinking: This Is How To Actually Change Negative Thoughts For Success by Melody Wilding

Excerpts:

…The problem with positive affirmations is that they operate at the surface level of conscious thinking and do nothing to contend with the subconscious mind where limiting beliefs really live.

…The truth is that it’s natural and healthy to experience a range of feelings, including less pleasant ones like disappointment, sadness or guilt. While there’s no question that ruminating in negative emotions can turn toxic, whitewashing your insecurities with positive thinking is merely a temporary fix.

…Unreasonably optimistic thinking can trigger a self-defeating spiral, particularly for those prone to anxiety and depression. Research shows that while repeating positive self-statements may benefit people with high self-regard, it can backfire for those lacking confidence.

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Breakthrough Success Depends on Your Productivity, Not Your Age by Drake Baer

Breakthrough Success Depends on Your Productivity, Not Your Age by Drake Baer

If you’re about to hit 30 or 40 or 50 or whatever, and you haven’t had your Breakthrough Success yet, don’t give up. Because according to a fancy new analysis of some 2,800 physicists — which is a hard field — your age isn’t nearly as important as your hustle.

…. Published this month in Science, a research team led by Roberta Sinatra of Central European University in Budapest dug back to right around the birth of the field, 1893. The researchers collected 2,856 physicists who had 20-year careers and had published “impact papers” — the kind of research that gets cited by fellow academics and covered by the press.

…Rather [the study revealed], productivity ruled: The more experiments a given researcher did, the more likely they’d score a hit paper.

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