Entertainers Cher and Goldie Hawn Admit to Struggles with Insecurity or Anxiety

Entertainers Cher and Goldie Hawn Admit to Struggles with Insecurity or Anxiety

I always find it interesting when people who eventually became successful in their profession, especially something as competitive as acting or singing, admit in interviews that they deal with low self esteem, anxiety, panic attacks, and insecurity – or that they did when first starting out.

Here are two articles pertaining to this, about Cher and Goldie Hawn:

Cher — Yes, THAT Cher — Still Has to Face Fears Every Time She Gets Onstage  – Dec. 2016

How Early Fame Caused Serious Panic Attacks for Goldie Hawn: ‘I Was Scared’ – May 2017

From

Cher — Yes, THAT Cher — Still Has to Face Fears Every Time She Gets Onstage  – Dec. 2016

Excerpt (in Q and A format with Cher):

Does it ever make you nervous that you’ve got to live up to some pretty high expectations when you perform?
I’m shaky before I go on. Once I go on, I know that I’m there to provide service, in a strange way. I’m there to make people happy. That’s my job.

Continue reading “Entertainers Cher and Goldie Hawn Admit to Struggles with Insecurity or Anxiety”

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‘The Bachelor’ Star Chris Soules Is Not the Nice Guy ABC Sold Us by Brandy Zadronzy

‘The Bachelor’ Star Chris Soules Is Not the Nice Guy ABC Sold Us by Brandy Zadronzy

Shades of actor Chris O’Dowd, who I would have believed to be a nice guy in real life based on his performance in the ‘Bridesmaids’ movie, but who turned out to be condescending, kind of gross, and a little sexist in real life or via some of the movie roles he went on to accept (read more about that here).

It is always such a bummer to me when I see someone on TV or in a movie – whether it’s a reality program, or a person who is playing a character – who seems like they’d be a genuinely nice person in real life, but they turn out to be rude, arrogant, deviant, or obnoxious in real life.

‘The Bachelor’ Star Chris Soules Is Not the Nice Guy ABC Sold Us

Billed as the charming small town fella—and antidote to the gross Juan Pablo—Soules, who stands accused of leaving the scene of an accident that left a man dead, is anything but.

Continue reading “‘The Bachelor’ Star Chris Soules Is Not the Nice Guy ABC Sold Us by Brandy Zadronzy”

“I got a letter saying I wasn’t what they were looking for” – news reporter Lester Holt

“I got a letter saying I wasn’t what they were looking for” – news reporter Lester Holt 

“I got a letter saying I wasn’t what they were looking for” – news reporter Lester Holt

If at first you don’t succeed, try, try again.

Although Lester Holt is now the anchor of “NBC Nightly News,” he revealed that his journalism career didn’t get off to a smooth start.

“In 1979, I was rejected for a job at NBC’s flagship radio station, WNBC,” he said in this week’s edition of Us Weekly’s 25 Questions. “I got a letter saying I wasn’t what they were looking for. I still smile every time I look at it.”…

[He went on to become a successful anchor with NBC network]


See Also:

Why the Best Success Stories Often Begin With Failure by Amy Crawford

Recovering from Failure – articles by various authors

Ten Famous Artists Who Had to Deal with Rejection During Their Lifetime by Lori McNee

News Anchor Melissa Francis: From Failure to Success

You’re Not Failing Enough, by Diane Paddison

Beatrix Potter, Work Rejected, Self-Published “The Tale of Peter Rabbit,” Now a Bestseller for All Time

After 27 Rejections, Dr. Seuss Almost Burned His First Unpublished Book – But He Hung In There and Went on to Become a Best-Selling Author

Entertainers Cher and Goldie Hawn Admit to Struggles with Insecurity or Anxiety

Become More Resilient by Learning to Take Joy Seriously by Brad Stulberg

Become More Resilient by Learning to Take Joy Seriously by Brad Stulberg

Become More Resilient by Learning to Take Joy Seriously

Excerpts:

Grant — who, among other things, studies how people find motivation and meaning in life — showed up at Goldberg’s funeral, assured Sandberg that even though she is strong, he’d be by her side.

He offered her evidence-based tips on how to become more resilient (for both her own good and for that of her children), then helped her apply them.

The two teamed up to write a book, Option B: Facing Adversity, Building Resilience, and Finding Joy, which details Sandberg’s experience and the topic of resilience more broadly. Though it was inspired by a deeply personal tragedy, the book is filled with insight that is useful for anyone overcoming loss or failure.

I recently spoke with Grant to discuss the book and some of the key concepts in it.

You write that there are “three Ps” that often diminish resilience: personalization, pervasiveness, and permanence. Can you briefly describe each?

These are common traps that people fall into after a negative event. It’s so easy to get stuck in rumination: It’s all my fault (personalization); this is going to ruin every aspect of my life (pervasiveness); I’m going to feel like this forever (permanence). There is a wide body of evidence that if you can minimize this kind of thinking, you’ll be more resilient.

Is one most challenging to overcome?

Permanence seems to be the hardest, by far. When we are feeling horrible, we tend to project that out indefinitely, and it’s sticky. It’s hard to convince yourself that the awful feelings won’t last forever.

It seems that a large part of avoiding the three Ps — and being resilient more broadly — is related to the stories that we tell ourselves about ourselves and our lives. Yet it’s human nature to focus on negatives over positives. How can people encourage themselves to tell positive, but not delusional, stories?

It’s a tightrope walk to embrace the feelings as they come and still find a way to craft a hopeful narrative. We have to give ourselves permission to feel sadness, but at the same, realize some meaning or happiness is out there, and include that in our story, too….

Continue reading “Become More Resilient by Learning to Take Joy Seriously by Brad Stulberg”

Sad Truth of Pop Singer George Michael’s Lonely Last Years

Sad Truth of Pop Singer’s George Michael’s Lonely Last Years

If you are over the age of 35 or 40, you should already know who George Michael is. If not: he was a very famous pop star who had a string of pop hits in the 1980s, some under the name of the musical duo he was in, “Wham!”

More proof that achieving world wide fame and wealth is not a guarantee of being happy, at peace, or being fulfilled:

Sad Truth of George Michael’s Lonely Last Years by Sarah Rainey, May 2017

Sad truth of George’s lonely last years – by man who knew him best: Hours of daytime TV. Binges on ready meals and Coco Pops. Shuffling around in pyjamas. In a candid interview, the star’s ex-lover reveals the stark reality behind the gilded facade

Four months after singer George Michael was found dead in his bed, the shrine outside his North London home continues to grow.

Ribbons and balloons are strung in the trees in the park opposite the £8 million mansion in Highgate, which George, 53, shared with his hair stylist partner Fadi Fawaz, 43, before his sudden death from a heart condition on Christmas Day.

…But to those who knew him well, there is an uncomfortable contrast between the fans’ depiction of George’s starry existence — and the rather mundane life he was really leading in the years and months before his untimely death.

The truth is that the singer had long since left those days behind, and beneath the glamorous facade was a sad, lonely man who felt he had little left to live for.

Behind the tired-looking blinds on the windows of his red-brick home, George used to spend his days hiding from the world, sitting in flannel pyjamas as he binged on daytime television, takeaways and cheap ready meals.

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Celebrity, Fame, and Fortune Don’t Always Guarantee Happiness and Fulfillment

Celebrity, Fame, and Fortune Don’t Always Guarantee Happiness and Fulfillment

I sometimes wonder about people who believe that becoming famous, sexy, or wealthy will make their life easier, better, or happier.

I don’t think fame and fortune are all that they are cracked up to be.

Some of the most pitiful, lonely, miserable people in the world are the people who are supposed to have it all, our society tells us: the good-looking, wealthy, and famous.

About every biography and article I read about a celebrity reveals that in spite of all their wealth and fame (or sex appeal, if they are known for that), they are deeply unhappy.

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How Successful People Stay Calm by Travis Bradberry

How Successful People Stay Calm by Travis Bradberry

How Successful People Stay Calm by Travis Bradberry

The ability to manage your emotions and remain calm under pressure has a direct link to your performance.

….As the human brain evolved and increased in complexity, we’ve developed the ability to worry and perseverate on events, which creates frequent experiences of prolonged stress.

Besides increasing your risk of heart disease, depression, and obesity, stress decreases your cognitive performance. Fortunately, though, unless a lion is chasing you, the bulk of your stress is subjective and under your control.

Top performers have well-honed coping strategies that they employ under stressful circumstances. This lowers their stress levels regardless of what’s happening in their environment, ensuring that the stress they experience is intermittent and not prolonged.

[Strategies for Coping with Stress]

They Appreciate What They Have

….They Avoid Asking “What If?”

“What if?” statements throw fuel on the fire of stress and worry.

Things can go in a million different directions, and the more time you spend worrying about the possibilities, the less time you’ll spend focusing on taking action that will calm you down and keep your stress under control.

Continue reading “How Successful People Stay Calm by Travis Bradberry”