Become More Resilient by Learning to Take Joy Seriously by Brad Stulberg

Become More Resilient by Learning to Take Joy Seriously by Brad Stulberg

Become More Resilient by Learning to Take Joy Seriously

Excerpts:

Grant — who, among other things, studies how people find motivation and meaning in life — showed up at Goldberg’s funeral, assured Sandberg that even though she is strong, he’d be by her side.

He offered her evidence-based tips on how to become more resilient (for both her own good and for that of her children), then helped her apply them.

The two teamed up to write a book, Option B: Facing Adversity, Building Resilience, and Finding Joy, which details Sandberg’s experience and the topic of resilience more broadly. Though it was inspired by a deeply personal tragedy, the book is filled with insight that is useful for anyone overcoming loss or failure.

I recently spoke with Grant to discuss the book and some of the key concepts in it.

You write that there are “three Ps” that often diminish resilience: personalization, pervasiveness, and permanence. Can you briefly describe each?

These are common traps that people fall into after a negative event. It’s so easy to get stuck in rumination: It’s all my fault (personalization); this is going to ruin every aspect of my life (pervasiveness); I’m going to feel like this forever (permanence). There is a wide body of evidence that if you can minimize this kind of thinking, you’ll be more resilient.

Is one most challenging to overcome?

Permanence seems to be the hardest, by far. When we are feeling horrible, we tend to project that out indefinitely, and it’s sticky. It’s hard to convince yourself that the awful feelings won’t last forever.

It seems that a large part of avoiding the three Ps — and being resilient more broadly — is related to the stories that we tell ourselves about ourselves and our lives. Yet it’s human nature to focus on negatives over positives. How can people encourage themselves to tell positive, but not delusional, stories?

It’s a tightrope walk to embrace the feelings as they come and still find a way to craft a hopeful narrative. We have to give ourselves permission to feel sadness, but at the same, realize some meaning or happiness is out there, and include that in our story, too….

…Journaling about negative emotions also helps, but not immediately. The dominant trend in journaling research is that when people write about a traumatic experience, initially they feel worse. But over the next few weeks and months, they see an uptick in both mental and physical health. It requires a tremendous amount of energy to bottle up emotions, so journaling is an outlet for some of that. Journaling can also help us make sense of difficult events. The evidence shows that journaling for just 15 minutes a few times can help.

It turns out that the happiest people are not those who maintain a constant level of happiness throughout their lives, but rather those who have dips and climbs, and who tell redemption narratives: stories where something bad happened, but something good came out of it.

(( read the rest here ))


See Also: 

How People Learn to Become Resilient by Maria Konnikova

Why the Best Success Stories Often Begin With Failure by Amy Crawford

Why Self-Compassion Works Better Than Self-Esteem by Olga Khazan

Recovering from Failure – articles by various authors

Ten Famous Artists Who Had to Deal with Rejection During Their Lifetime by Lori McNee

You’re Not Failing Enough, by Diane Paddison

How to Stop Caring About What Other People Think – Don’t Let A Little Criticism Hold You Back, by Simran Takhar

Forget Positive Thinking: This Is How To Actually Change Negative Thoughts For Success by M. Wilding

After 27 Rejections, Dr. Seuss Almost Burned His First Unpublished Book – But He Hung In There and Went on to Become a Best-Selling Author

Best-Sellers Initially Rejected

Top 10 Regrets Of The Dying by Dale Partridge

Why the Fear of Rejection Overrides One’s Ability to Ask for What They Want or Need

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Please log in using one of these methods to post your comment:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s